Water Rescue Manikins



The water rescue manikins of choice for British and US Navies, all UK Fire Services and NATO forces worldwide - these dummies perfectly simulate unconscious casualties in water.

Supplied in two forms - Man Overboard and Search and Rescue and two weights 20 & 40Kg:

The man overboard model is supplied with bright orange overalls and SOLAS reflective tape on the head and is designed to be as conspicuous as possible.

The Search & Rescue model is supplied with black overalls and a black mesh hood to cover the head - this model is designed to be as inconspicuous as possible to enable rescue teams to practice search, as well as their recovery techniques.

The Search & Rescue manikin is made to the same specification as the Man overboard model and has exactly the same level of buoyancy. Both models have two pockets to the lower legs of the overalls - to make the manikin float horizontally simply move the 6 foam pieces from the front chest to the pockets on each leg.

All water rescue training dummies are supplied complete with Wellington boots which greatly protect the legs if dragged over hard surfaces - they are easily replaceable if damaged. The protective overalls keep the body clean and greatly increases the lifespan of the dummy; they are produced using a rip stop, polyurethane Polyester, in orange (to BS EN 471) for the Man-Overboard model and black for the Search and Rescue model.

The Man Overboard dummy can be supplied with a black ‘hoodie’, which will effectively turn it into a Search & Rescue dummy.



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